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We Have the Power

295847_275904639097444_275683962452845_888162_128040056_nOur institutions ceased a very long ago to represent the interests of the people. Our media, government bureaucracies, schools and academic institutions have become corrupt enemies of the people’s interest. There is a much better way to organize government in order to ensure justice, prosperity and social sanity. The Dharma Manifesto explains how. Read it today!


Reaction, Revolution and Dharma Renaissance

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Reaction, Revolution and Dharma Renaissance:
The Case of “Hindu” Nationalism

By Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya

The following article is from chapter 2 of the groundbreaking new political work “The Dharma Manifesto”, by Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya.

Every major question in history is a religious question. It has more effect in molding life than nationalism or a common language.”

– Hilaire Belloc (1870-1953)

The following paper will examine the Indian social movement known variously as “Hindu” Nationalism, or “Hindutva”[1].

The overtly political aspects of the ongoing Hindu renaissance that has been haphazardly developing for the last approximately 135 years, along with its repeated failure to secure its self-stated aim of instantiating Rama-rajya (Dharmic rule) on the political scene, are crucial topics that very few Hindu intellectuals have addressed in an ideologically cogent and politically mature manner.  Some of the few intellectual leaders who have, in fact, addressed this issue in a truly systematic and well-formulated ideological way include Dr. David Frawley (Sri Vedacharya Vamadeva Shastri), Sitaram Goel, Ram Swarup and Dr. Koenraad Elst.  I have also written about this topic very extensively, but have only begun releasing a limited number of my writings on this matter to the general public starting in early 2011, The Dharma Manifesto being the ideological dénouement of these writings.  The following are a few thoughts on the current state of contemporary Dharma politics on the South Asian subcontinent, with an emphasis on the specific case of what is often termed “Hindu” Nationalism.

As we will see, the primary stumbling block that has relegated the greater Hindutva movement to near irrelevancy in the dual realms of both ideological development and engaged political action has been:

1) Its preponderance of reactionary thinking and action, rather than proactive cultivation of a more revolutionary outlook and practical strategy to both a.)gain political power and to b.) consequently govern the Indian nation-state along purely Dharmic principles.

2) The lack of the divinely-bestowed spiritual empowerment that is necessary for any self-described religious-based movement to secure meaningful success.

By the time the British and other European powers began the incremental process of colonial domination in India and the rest of South Asia in 1757, much of the Hindu community in north India specifically had already experienced hundreds of years of genocidal religious cleansing at the hands of the Mughals and other Islamic invaders before them. Without doubt, the establishment of European rule over India directly saved Hinduism (and, arguably, much of Vedic spiritual culture that served as the ancient basis of the later phenomenon of “Hinduism”) from inexorable extinction at the hands of Islam.  If the British had not assumed the administration of India when they did, Hinduism would most likely not exist today, and all of present day India would be an Islamic state. All followers of Dharma must be eternally grateful to the British for this inadvertent rescue of the non-Islamic elements of Indian culture.

During the more liberal atmosphere of the British Raj period (1857-1947), history witnessed the beginning stages of a budding, if often very confused, and ultimately self-abnegating, Hindu renaissance with the emergence of such neo-Hindu movements as the Arya Samaj, Ramakrishna Mission and Hindu Mahasabha, as well as such Hindu leaders as Swami Vivekananda (1863-1902), Bhaktivinode Thakura (1838-1914), Bal Gangadhar Tilak (1856-1920), Arumuga Navalar (1822-1879), Gedong Bagus Oka (1921-2002), Sister Nivedita (1867-1911)[2], Annie Besant (1847-1933)[3], and many others. As a result of the rediscovery of their Vedic heritage on the part of many 19th century and early 20th century Hindu intellectual leaders, a new sense of political activism in the name of a rediscovered “Hinduism” cautiously developed with the nascent political theories of such people as Vinayak Damodar Savarkar (1883-1966) and Keshav Baliram Hedgewar (1889-1940).

The culmination of this new movement, which was decidedly devoted to a Hindu identity politics, has resulted in the overwhelmingly dominant role of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh (founded in 1925) and its greater Sangh Pariwar family of front organizations over the realm of Hindu politics in India for the last 85 years.  The overtly political manifestation of the Sangh Pariwar movement was eventually manifest in the later Jana Sangh political party.  The party operated under this name from 1951-1980.  It was founded by Dr. Shyama Prasad Mookerjee (1901-1953), who was subsequently murdered by the Congress Party regime in 1953. Since 1980, the party has been known by the name Bharatiya Janata Party.[4]

There has been a clear, multi-stage trajectory in which pro-Hindu political ideology and activism have progressed in the last 135 or so years.  Before I discuss the nature of that trajectory in any significant depth, first I need to lay out the three general morphologies that most political formulations have historically taken.  There are three general forms of political activity observable in the modern political realm: 1) Utopian, 2) Reactionary, 3) Revolutionary.

Utopian designates a primarily futuristic-oriented politics that tends to be very unrealistic and fantasy-fueled.  In many cases utopian-based ideologies tend to be eschatologically-driven and millennial in outlook, with the never-achieved (or achievable) promise of a perfect paradise on earth that can only be delivered by the particular political movement making the given promise. Such disastrously failed movements as Marxism, Leninism, Maoism, Anarchism and the political Left in general are Utopian in nature.

Reactionary, on the contrary, is primarily past-oriented[5] and looks toward a “better, more ordered time”, that is historically usually no more than several generations previous to the present era, as the archetypal hallmark and model for present-day cultural renewal.  As Nicolás Gómez Dávila  explains the mindset of the reactionary: “The reactionary is, nevertheless, the fool who takes up the vanity of condemning history and the immorality of resigning himself to it.” American reactionaries, for example, tend to see the 1950s as the apex of American civilization. As is clear from the term itself, reactionaries are capable only of reacting to assaults on tradition that they detect around them, and are usually incapable of proffering pro-active and positive ideas for how to foundationally transform society for the better in the face of modernity’s degenerate encroachment upon traditional values and culture. Reactionaries are especially known for timidity, intellectual incuriosity, lack of vision, as well as narrow parochialism and immaturely expressed xenophobia.  Republicans, Tories, and the conservative Right in general fall under this general heading. Utopian and Reactionary represent the two furthest opposing extremes of the political spectrum.

Revolutionary, on the other hand, describes a political stance that is proactive and constructive in nature, rather than merely utopian or reactionary.  Rather than supporting either unrealistic utopian goals, or merely reacting in an ineffectively knee-jerk fashion to the incessant attacks of its opponents,  the revolutionary perspective proffers positive systemic change designed to transform the basic characteristics of a presently-given social reality in a wholly original and fundamental way.  Revolutionaries seek to alter society, not merely peripherally and incrementally, but foundationally and swiftly.

In the very specifically Hindu/Vedic context, the revolutionary perspective looks at the ancient past (and not merely two or three generations back, but millennia back) as the source from which to derive eternal principles that are designed to be used in the present day to create a radically better future. The Dharmic revolutionary subscribes to an archeofuturism, to use Guillaume Faye’s instructive terminology.[6] Rather than merely dreaming about an unobtainable future based upon blind faith and wishful thinking, or conversely, merely reacting in a frustrated manner to the negative occurrences happening around them, revolutionaries seek systemic (and not merely cosmetic) change in the here and now.

The term “Revolutionary” tends to carry with it the stereotyped, and wholly inaccurate, notion of political violence, which is not at all the technical denotation of this word in political science terminology.  Rather, by “Revolutionary” is meant a concept, ideology or movement whose aim is to affect fundamental systemic changes (i.e., a change of the prevailing system itself), rather than merely cosmetic or surface change alone (i.e., minutial changes and readjustments within the confines of the system).  With this proper understanding of the terminology, the term “Revolutionary” does not in any way denote violence.

In brief, a Revolutionary movement must have the following features:

A) It is predicated upon a grand, but rationally achievable, vision.

B) It is led by a professional vanguard of elite leaders dedicated to achieving the vision, (b.i) who are capable of intellectually formulating that vision into ideological form, (b.ii) who know how to organize the masses in both the largest and most effective ways necessary to achieve the vision, and (b.iii) who themselves wholly personify the vision of the movement in their own personal character and lifestyle; i.e., the leader is the movement.

C) It has a clearly and systematically formulated ideology that encompasses the totality of political concern, including a comprehensive and defensible internal ideological structure, the minutia of economics, a philosophy of governance, social relations, geopolitical formulations, etc.

D) It has the ability to both formulate constructive alliances with like-motivated movements/organizations, and has a keen understanding of all aspects of the opposing forces.

E) Most importantly of all: a revolutionary has the resolute will to win.

As we look at the last 135 or so years of modern Hinduism, we see that Hindu forms of political expression have progressed roughly and sequentially, though certainly with significant overlaps, through the above three stages of Utopian, Reactionary, and Revolutionary.

“We Are One” – Utopian Stage (1875-1925)

Beginning in the Colonial era, and continuing down to today, such historical trends as the 19th century neo-Hindu movements and Radical Universalism, as well as such historic figures as Swami Vivekananda, Gandhi, and many of the earlier gurus who came to the West, clearly represented an early Utopian stage of Hindu political expression.  The concerns of such Hindu Utopians included such unrealistic liberal Western notions as radical egalitarianism, universalism, evolutionary and historico-progressive world-views, temporal-centrism,[7] and such emotionally-driven eschatological visions as the future establishment of a pan-ecumenical world political order – what today would be more accurately termed the New World Order.  Such intellectually puerile sentiments, however, did not (and could not) lead to the type of strong Vedic restoration movement necessary to revive Dharma globally.

Such a Vedic restoration is necessarily radically traditionalist in nature, and is thoroughly opposed to all the key corrosive elements that have rendered modernity non-viable. The German intellectual Edgar Julius Jung (1894-1934) presciently describes a similar vision of such a restoration in the following way.

Restoration of all those elementary laws and values without which man loses his ties with nature and God and without which he is incapable of building up a true order. In the place of equality there will be inherent standards, in the place of social consciousness a just integration into the hierarchical society, in the place of mechanical election an organic elite, in the place of bureaucratic leveling the inner responsibility of genuine self-government, in the place of mass prosperity the rights of a proud people.”[8]

For Sanatana Dharma to both survive and thrive in the coming decades and centuries, a thorough Vedic Restoration along the lines of Jung’s words above must be brought about – a reaffirmation of Sanatana Dharma’s most ancient and orthodox cultural and spiritual expression in direct contradistinction to the values of both Western materialist modernity and shortsighted Indian nationalism (i.e., “Hindu” Nationalism).

Most of the formulators and present-day thinkers of the “Hindu Nationalist” movement represent, to one degree or another, a rather sharp historical and conceptual disconnect from the traditional Sanatana Dharma that had been taught by the Vedic Acharyas and that had been practiced by the common Hindu people for thousands of years.  After 1000 years of genocidal battering on the part of Islamic invaders, modern Hinduism was definitely not at the height of its intellectual, cultural, spiritual and political/military glory by the time the British arrived on the scene.  By the time the British had saved Vedic culture from extinction, a radically traditional Sanatana Dharma, in its unapologetic, pristine, and consciously Vedic-centric form, needed desperately to be reconstructed by her intellectuals and spiritual leaders. Unfortunately, a serious process of tradition-oriented reconstruction was not seriously attempted at that time.

Instead of seeing the dire problems with Hinduism that were present by the 18th and 19th centuries as something that needed to be addressed and cured from within the confines of Sanatana Dharma, the neo-Hindus instead turned to external, non-Vedic, sources for their guiding inspiration. As a result, rather than attempting a true reconstruction of authentic Sanatana Dharma, which would have made Sanatana Dharma strong and pure once again, they instead attempted an unnecessary “reform” of Sanatana Dharma along the lines of Christian norms and ideals.

Thus we saw the Christian-inspired, neo-Hindu obsessions with eliminating “caste”, eliminating sati, eliminating murti worship, Christian style monotheism, “social reform” at the expense of intellectual/spiritual development, Hegelian historicism, and Radical Universalism. Attendant upon these superfluous “reforms”, we now witness the sad legacy of a Hindu world confused about what it believes, about what even constitutes a “Hindu”, about its future, as well as Hindu children who are not interested in Hinduism, and a Hindu community of almost one billion people many of whom suffer from inferiority complexes and the psychological scars of a people disconnected from their true spiritual heritage.  What Sanatana Dharma really needed was never “reform” along these neo-Hindu lines, but rather a positive tradition-based reconstruction of its eternal ideals. “Hinduism” needed to re-embrace its true essence as Sanatana Dharma – the Eternal Natural Way.

What Sanatana Dharma needed – and still needs! – were two interdependent developments.

A) A reclamation of Vedic-based, traditional Sanatana Dharma, with a highly orthodox, Vedic-centric understanding of the unitive and integral Vedic culture that had sustained Sanatana Dharma for 5000 years. It needed a purely Vedic understanding of pramana (valid means of knowledge and derivation of authority), of the nature of Dharma (in the strictest of philosophical senses, not just the popular sense), of what constitutes Vaidika (Vedic) vs. Avaidika (non-Vedic), etc.

B) Once the pure Tradition of Sanatana Dharma was reconstructed, the next organic development needed to be a strictly Vedic-based strategy for both juxtaposing, but also actively interfacing, traditional Sanatana Dharma with the modern world.

The latter project of fostering dialogue between Sanatana Dharma and modernity needed to be done, not by falsely denying the differences between the two (as almost all of the 19th century proto-Hindutva figures attempted via Radical Universalism), but in the same manner that every other ancient culture had met the challenge of modernity: recognition of most modern religions/ideologies as purva-pakshas – opposing ideological constructs; friendly and open debate with these purva-pakshas; unapologetic assurance in the exceptional status of Sanatana Dharma, and a concomitant refusal to concede to the forced imposition of an inferior status.

Unfortunately, because the unneeded distraction of “Hindu reform” became the more easily accomplished dominant paradigm of the hour, to this very day the real project of Vedic reconstruction outlined above has barely gotten off the ground.  It is now time to begin the process.

Many of the “Hindu reformers” were well-motivated and sincere persons who truly felt that they were acting in the interests of Sanatana Dharma. Many of Ramakrishna’s words are very inspiring and wise. Swami Vivekananda was a truly courageous and talented leader who the Hindu people can and should take immense pride in. More, many of these personalities did accomplish some good in providing at least some modicum of a vehicle for interfacing Sanatana Dharma and modernity, however self-destructive this particular vehicle has ending up being in the long-run.  In formulating a Christian-inspired paradigm for Vedic survival with only short-term successes in mind, however, they did not have the long-term implications of their syncretism in mind.

“We Are Different” – Reactionary Stage (1925-1945)

Beginning roughly in the Interwar period (the 1920s and 1930s), we then see the formulation of a strictly Reactionary form of Hindu politics with the emergence of Savarkar, Savitri Devi (the European Pagan writer Maximiani Portas, 1905-1982),[9] the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, etc. The uniformed paramilitary formations, martial aesthetic, stress on character development, egalitarian ethos combined with a rigid hierarchical structure, and much of the generic patriotic rhetoric of the RSS was directly appropriated from the newly immerging, parallel nationalist movements that were sweeping the European continent during the 1920s.

Unlike their much more successful European counterparts, however, this new reactionary Hindu movement had very few innovative ideas, did not know how to successfully engage in politics either electorally (not till the 1980s at the earliest) or in terms of mass mobilization (other than borrowing heavily from the paramilitary structure earlier developed by their much more successful counterparts in the various nationalist organizations of contemporary Europe), were wholly disconnected from the traditionalist and orthodox Vedic understanding and practice of the Yoga tradition, had no clear understanding of Dharmic political theory, and most importantly, did not know how to construct an elite political vanguard capable of leading the people by their own spiritual example.

The RSS and Sangh Pariwar defined itself, both historically and to this very day, exclusively in negative juxtaposition to what they were not: they were not Muslims; they were not Christians; they were not Marxists; thus, if only by necessary default, they were “Hindus”.  However, to this very day, the RSS has found itself incapable of defining in positive identitarian terms what it actually means to be a Hindu in the spiritual sense of this term. Savarkar’s blind imitation of then-fashionable European racialist theory in the formulation of his interpretation of “Hindutva”, or “Hinduness”, as designating a specifically racial group was doomed to failure from the outset. For Savarkar and all those who followed in his footsteps, being Hindu meant being Indian; being Indian meant being Hindu. Thus, Hinduism for the Hindu Nationalists was merely another term for the Indian race![10] Being a politician, and not a Vedic philosopher, Savarkar did not understand that Sanatana Dharma does not equate to the Indian race. Sanatana Dharma is a world-view and spiritual tradition. It is the sacred heritage, not merely of those people who happen to possess an Indian passport, but of the entirety of the Indo-European peoples.

To this day, rather than facilitating the radical, systemic change necessary to bring about a new Dharma civilization (which is clearly not at all the aim of these Hindutva movements, and never has been), the Reactionary tendency in pro-Hindu politics has shown itself to be an un-visionary, anti-intellectual, philosophically impotent and currently irrelevant political force. It finds itself dedicated more to a rather light version of Indian Nationalist conservatism than Vedic nation building.

The deepest extent of their political program essentially consists of a return to an era more within the comfort zone of the octogenarian men who lead this reactionary movement – possibly a return to India circa 1855 for Savarkar and Hedgewar, or an India circa 1955 for an Atal Bihari Vajpayee and Lal Krishna Advani. A Dharma Nation will never be achieved by the feckless Reactionaries, if only because such a goal is not even within the scope of their actual aims or intellectual understanding.

Sadly, the vast bulk of so-called “Hindu activism” that takes place today still falls under the category of Reactionary, and is more a reflection of amorphous Indian Nationalism, and general pride of place and ethnicity than any serious attempt to reorder society (either Indian, American, or global) in such a manner as to reflect Dharmic principles instantiated in concrete political form.

Many of the attempts at polemical and ideological writing that we have seen arising from “Hindu Nationalists” make it all too apparent that they are not yet politically mature enough to either vie for power or to govern a working nation-state. When, and only when, it comes to the point that self-described “Hindu Nationalists” develop the philosophical maturity to engage in the nuanced ideological struggle necessary to win power, and only when they learn how to develop temporary and practical alliances with others while also keeping the greater goal of political power in mind, will they be ready to govern the current nation-state of India. Only then will “India” become Vedic Bharat once again! Contemporary “Hindu Nationalism” needs to move away from the fantasy-rhetoric level that they have wallowed in for so many decades, and begin the hard work of engaging in real politics in the real world.

“We are Vedic!” – Transforming the RSS into a Revolutionary Movement

Without doubt, the current attempt at Vedic restoration is seen as almost being synonymous with the vision, leadership, organizational structures and ideological pronouncements of the RSS movement.  With approximately six million dedicated activists, the RSS is officially the largest volunteer organization on the Earth today. Unfortunately, the RSS has served as a sadly flawed and ideologically challenged vehicle for Vedic restoration.  The RSS will need to address the following problems if it is going to transform itself from a Reactionary movement to a Revolutionary one:

A) Distinguishing between Indian Nationalism versus Vedic Restorationism.  Many difficulties arise when these two separate concerns become indistinguishable, as they very clearly have in the minds of almost all “Hindu Nationalists”.  Indian Nationalism is an ethnicity/national/racial movement.  Vedic Restoration, on the other hand, is a religious/cultural/philosophical one.  The RSS has, in my opinion, been more of an Indian Nationalist movement than a Vedic Restorationist movement. More, this is the primary reason why the BJP so badly lost the Indian national election of 2004 – because they tried to appeal to Muslims, Christians, pseudo-secularists, and other non-Hindu Indians merely as patriotic Indians, rather than appealing exclusively to the majority community as follower of Sanatana Dharma[11].  The RSS’s main concern has become Indian Nationalism rather than Sanatana Dharma…and this has only set the movement back.

B) Within the current day Vedic Restorationist movement, we must clarify the difference between Hindu Revival (a political/social/cultural phenomenon), which the RSS is predominantly engaged in, versus Vedic Reconstruction, (an intellectual/academic/philosophical/spiritual matrix of projects), which is precisely what such individuals as David Frawley, Swami Dayananda Sarasvati, Shrikant Talageri, Subhash Kak and myself, as well as other, more traditionalist, Vedic thinkers are engaged in. Both are projects of seemingly rival significance, and the different natures, goals and methods of these two separate projects need to be understood.

C) Within the parallel projects of Hindu Revival and Vedic Reconstruction, we need to distinguish between a Neo-Hindu versus a Traditionalist world-view, which has been addressed to a much greater extent in the book Radical Universalism: Are All Religions the Same?, by Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya.

The RSS is currently a neo-Hindu, revivalist, Indian Nationalist movement. What it needs to become is a Traditionalist Vedic Reconstructionist movement. Like some of the 19th century neo-Hindus of the past, the RSS has done much good for the Indian nation-state historically. The RSS has been on the front-lines of defending Hindu India from foreign aggression, both military and missionary.[12] The sacrifices of countless individual RSS members are too numerous to mention.  Today, however, both India and Sanatana Dharma need radically more. The RSS needs to change quite radically if it is going to maintain itself as an effective organization in the future.

The following is a ten point program that Hindu Nationalists should implement if they truly wish to transform their nation of India for the better.

1) Annihilate the immediate existential threat from the Communist terrorists, Islamic Jihadists and Christian missionaries who have enslaved your country.

2) Stop graduating countless engineers, “IT professionals” and medical personnel, and instead begin to once again encourage your children to become philosophers, sadhus (sages), artists, thinkers, warriors and leaders.

3) Revive the Kshatriya warrior spirit of your ancestors and no longer revel in weakness in the name of ahimsa.

4) Re-Aryanize, re-Vedicize and re-spiritualize the entirety of your present-day culture.

5) Eliminate the Dalit problem once and for all by allowing those many individuals who are eligible among this community to enter the varna system in accordance with their inherent individual psycho-physical nature. If a Dalit behaves like a brahmana, then he is a brahmana. Period!

6) Learn to interact with modernity in a successful manner. That means, without excuses, rededicating yourselves to excellence and perfection in everything you do and communicate.

7) Build your own economy instead of depending upon the West for economic success via immigration and outsourcing of jobs. To do this, you will need to completely exorcise your economy of even the slightest taint of socialism and collectivism. Once and for all – Socialism simply does not work!

8) Start to carry yourselves with courage and pride in your Vedic heritage, rather than viewing this heritage as an embarrassing burden from the past. If you do not reclaim your immense Vedic heritage, someone else will reclaim it from you.

9) Make spoken Sanskrit the sole recognized language of your nation.

10) To successfully achieve all of the above, stop reaching for any and all excuses for why you have not yet been able to achieve these goals. Victory belongs only to those who reject excuses. Then, and only then, will Bharat regain the respect of the world.

Dharma Nationalism: A New Revolutionary Approach

The new stage that Hindu activism needs to take is undoubtedly the Revolutionary approach. It is clear that Indian Hindus now need to enter the Post-RSS phase of Hindu activism. As a starting point, 21st century Hindu activism needs to make a sharp break from its more paranoid and pessimistic past, and begin to start thinking in much more realistic, concrete, strategic and winning terms.

The enemies of Dharma have had the gift of being able to think and strategize on a long-term basis. Their end goal has always been the end of Dharmic civilization and the creation of their own dystopic vision of reality ranging centuries into the future! Contemporary Hindu activism, on the other hand, has only seemed able to operate reactively, only thinking about some immediate injustices that have just occurred in the news today – and even then only rarely reacting effectively, if at all. The contemporary Indian Hindu activist movement needs to stop looking for excuses, and beat the enemy at their own game.

A truly Revolutionary Dharma activist movement has not existed on the world scene until 2012.  The seeds of its birth have now come to fruition in the form of the Dharma Nationalist movement.

Indeed, the Indian nationalist fueled “Hindu” activism of the past will now quickly take a back seat to the spiritually fueled Dharma Nationalist activism of the future. Unlike parochial “Hindu Nationalism”, Dharma Nationalist activism is, indeed, comprehensively total in its application. It is based primarily upon spiritual/philosophical concern, and only secondarily on ethnic/national concern. It is motivated by the spiritual insight and compassion gifted to us by the eternal Truth of Sanatana Dharma, and not merely on an empty pride residing in the relative and temporal, ever-changing geographical boundaries of the nation-state of India. It fosters a true selfless action akin with that of the rishis, and not merely a series of political calculations based upon the personal need for power and aggrandizement.

More crucial than any other juxtaposing comparison to the failed Hindu activist endeavors of the past: Dharma Nationalism presents a clear, realistic, and achievable strategic diagram revealing exactly how society should be best structured in order to ensure the maximal amount of happiness and prosperity, to the fullest degree of qualitative and spiritual depth, for the greatest number of living beings. This fact will be abundantly evident upon an attentive reading of The Dharma Manifesto.



[1] Tentatively translated as “Hinduness”.

[2] Born as Margaret Elizabeth Noble, an Irish social worker who abandoned Christianity and became a follower of Sanatana Dharma.

[3] The second leader of the Theosophical Society after Helena Petrovna Blavatsky (1831-1891).

[4] “Indian People’s Party”.

[5] Reactionaries do not look to ancient or Classical antecedents for guidance for the present, but tend to only look back a few generations at most.

[6] See Guillaume Faye’s Archeofuturism: European Visions of the Post-Catastrophic Age for more on this innovative concept.

[7] My term for the deceivingly comforting psychological phenomenon exhibited by any given generation that convinces them that the particular era in which they find themselves represents the most important and advanced era in history. A much more healthy approach in reconciling one’s subjective perception with the particular times in which one finds oneself was nicely stated by the German philosopher Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805) in the following manner: “Live with your century, but do not be its creature.” (On the Aesthetic Education of Man)

[8] Edgar J. Jung, Deutsche uber Deutschland (Munich, 1932), p. 380.

[9] Savitri Devi and Savarkar were in agreement on several basic issues of Hindu Nationalism. Babarao G.D. Savarkar, brother of V.D. Savarkar, even wrote the Forward to Savitri Devi’s book “A Warning to the Hindus“.

[10] “India is dear to us because it has been and is the home of our Hindu Race, the land which has been the cradle of our prophets, and heroes and Gods and godmen …. The real meaning of Swarajya then, is not merely the geographical independence of the bit of earth called India. To the Hindus independence of Hindusthan can only be worth having if that ensures their Hindutva – their religious, racial and cultural identity.” (Vinayak Damodar Savarkar  Hindu Rashtra Darshan, vol. 4, pp. 218-9)

[11] Approximately 83% of the Indian population are followers of Sanatana Dharma – a clear majority.

[12] Balraj Madhok, the president of the Bharatiya Jana Sangh party in the late 1960s, is a living example of the patriotic fervour of Hindu Nationalism. He wrote the following in 1970: “Western countries also have been exerting to exploit India’s illiteracy and poverty by using their economic aid measures, their cheap and provocative literature, and, above all, their missionaries as instruments for a campaign of mass conversion. We want to warn these foreign powers not to indulge in activities that violate India’s sovereignty and independence and demand that the Government of India take stern measures to curb them.” (Indianisation? What, Why and How. New Delhi: S. Chand, 1970, p. 103)

This article is from chapter 2 of the groundbreaking new political work “The Dharma Manifesto”, by Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya.

The Dharma Manifesto serves as the first ever systematic revolutionary blueprint for the nascent global Vedic movement that will, in the very near future, arise to change the course of world history for the betterment of all living beings. The Dharma Manifesto signals the beginning of a wholly new era in humanity’s eternal yearning for meaningful freedom and happiness.

About the Author

Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya has been acknowledged by many Hindu leaders throughout the world to be one of the most revolutionary and visionary Vedic spiritual masters on the Earth today.

With a forty year history of intensely practicing the spiritual disciplines of Yoga, and with a Ph.D. in Religious Studies, Sri Acharyaji is one of the most eminently qualified authorities on Vedic philosophy, culture and spirituality. He is the Director of the Center for the Study of Dharma and Civilization.

His most historically groundbreaking politico-philosophical work, “The Dharma Manifesto”, is now offered to the world at a time when its people are most desperately crying out for fundamental change.


Vegetarianism: Celebrating Life

Vegetarianism: Celebrating Life

By Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya

The reasons for becoming a vegetarian are many. Vegetarianism makes sense from every possible perspective.

Health – Vegetarians have been shown to live longer, as well as suffer much less from such health problems as cancer, heart-disease and other illnesses. Contrary to popular belief, meat foods are not a necessary component of the human diet. In fact, evolutionarily and biologically, humans are not designed to be carnivores. Our teeth and intestinal structures are best suited for an herbivorous (vegetarian) diet.

Economic – A cow has to be fed up to 16 pounds of grain in order to produce only one pound of beef. If this grain were to be fed directly to human beings, world starvation could be eliminated. In addition, the meat industry is one of the most heavily federally subsidized industries in America. Your tax dollars are being wasted supporting an industry that produces an inefficient and unhealthy product.

Environmental – Central and South American rain forests are being decimated at the alarming rate of 2.5 acres per second. Much of this destruction is occurring in order to provide grazing land for beef cattle. Every burger we eat represents a tree mowed down in a rain forest. Also, the meat industry has been repeatedly cited as one of the major industries responsible for massive pollution, including the dumping of noxious wastes into our nation’s water supplies.

Ethical – To kill or give pain to any living creature, especially when such actions are unnecessary and not in self-defense, is morally unjustified. Like you and I, animals are sentient living beings, and have been proven to be capable of feeling pain and suffering. Animals, like humans, cry out if cut; they scream if killed; they mourn if separated from those they love. God created animals, not for us to torture and gobble up thoughtlessly, but to cooperate with, learn from and protect. If we are, indeed, vastly superior to animals in both our ethical development and in our sense of justice, should we not perhaps behave as such?

Spiritual – Most of the world’s varied religious traditions are opposed to creating unnecessary suffering. The two most important qualities that many spiritual paths attempt to instill in their adherents are wisdom and compassion. These qualities are impossible to develop as long as we engage in violence of any sort. However insignificant or distant an act of violence may appear to us (such as the killing and eating of animals), it nonetheless contributes to an overall social attitude of justifying violence. Violent minds lead to violent lifestyles. In such a state of consciousness, it is impossible to make any serious advancement on one’s chosen spiritual path.

These, and many other considerations, make it quite clear that the vegetarian alternative is a lifestyle that is both reasonable and healthy for your body, mind and soul. We hope these facts have given you a little food for thought, and that you will consider becoming a vegetarian. For more information on vegetarianism, please visit Dharmacentral.com


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Understanding the True Self

śravaṇᾱyᾱpi bahubhir yo na labhyaḥ
śṛṇvanto’pi bahavo yaṁ na
vidyuḥ
ᾱścaryo vaktᾱ kuśalo’sya labdhᾱ
ᾱścaryo jñᾱtᾱ kuśalᾱnuśiṣṭaḥ

“To many the gift is not given to hear of the nature of the true self. Many, though they hear of the true self, do not understand it. Wonderful is he who speaks of it; intelligent is he who learns of it. Blessed is he who, taught by a good teacher, is actually able to understand it.”

Katha Upanishad, 1.2.7


The Vedic Art of Leadership

Whether we refer to the unprecedented problems we are experiencing in the economy, on the political scene, or in the rapid degeneration of cultural, social and spiritual standards, we know that we are living in an era of tremendous global crisis. As Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya explains in this timely and important video, the root cause of all these peripheral crises can be directly attributed to a deep crisis in leadership. We are lacking able leaders. We are, today, lacking credible political, spiritual and cultural leaders who are equipped to lead us out of the darkness and into the light. In this bold presentation, Sri Acharyaji explains to us the current crisis that we are facing, how our leadership has fallen far short in their sacred duty toward their people, and what must be done to create a future leadership that will ensure the rebirth of spiritual civilization and a more just world. If you are currently occupying a leadership position, if you aspire to someday become a leader, or if you understand the importance of leadership during this time of global crisis, you must see this greatly enlightening video today.


Scientific Verification of Vedic Knowledge

Dharmic civilization represents the most scientific, rational, and natural world-view in the world today.


The Restoration

The Restoration

 

What once was shall be again. A Vedic Restoration is coming. The Dharma Nation Movement will usher in the Restoration.


The Vedic Art of Leadership

 

Whether we refer to the unprecedented problems we are experiencing in the economy, on the political scene, or in the rapid degeneration of cultural, social and spiritual standards, we know that we are living in an era of tremendous global crisis. As Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya explains in this timely and important video, the root cause of all these peripheral crises can be directly attributed to a deep crisis in leadership. We are lacking able leaders. We are, today, lacking credible political, spiritual and cultural leaders who are equipped to lead us out of the darkness and into the light. In this bold presentation, Sri Acharyaji explains to us the current crisis that we are facing, how our leadership has fallen far short in their sacred duty toward their people, and what must be done to create a future leadership that will ensure the rebirth of spiritual civilization and a more just world. If you are currently occupying a leadership position, if you aspire to someday become a leader, or if you understand the importance of leadership during this time of global crisis, you must see this greatly enlightening video today.

For much more information about the spiritual tradition of Sanatana Dharma, visit: www.dharmacentral.com


Revolution of Love

Arise Arjuna

Bhakti, or single minded devotional meditation upon Bhagavan (God), has always been, by its very inherent nature, the most powerful and dynamic social force on earth. Bhakti is an unparalleled motivating force that has induced revolutionary and meaningful change throughout world history. It will also serve as the driving spiritual force that will revive and strengthen Dharma well into the 21st Century. The only meaningful revolution is a revolution based on love.”  – Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya


Who Has The Truth?

Does the mere fact that there is a diversity of opinion on Truth mean that there consequently is no Truth? Is Truth just a matter of opinion? This powerful video lays these philosophical questions to rest once and for all.


Becoming a Follower of Sanatana Dharma

Follow Sanatana DharmaWe live in an age in which people have found it increasingly challenging to express the life-giving principles of spirituality and religion with as much seriousness, enthusiasm and dedication as was once the case. All around us, we witness on a daily basis all the destructive ravages that materialism, consumerism, greed, anger, lust and self-centeredness have forced upon our once saner world. Much of the war, poverty, sense of depression and meaningless, and social ills that are rampant today are directly due to the clear failures of atheism and an unsatisfying lifestyle dedicated to the pursuit of material acquisitions to the detriment of our inner spiritual growth. We have substituted television for meditation, emailing for prayer, texting for real communication, the Internet for community, and sports for spirituality. Given all the daily challenges that we find ourselves facing today, it is understandable that some of us might find ourselves asking the question: “Why should I be a follower of Sanatana Dharma?”

What precisely does Sanatana Dharma have to offer us? How can this ancient, spiritual world-view and culture help us as individuals, help our family, and help to bring about a much better world?

The truth is there are many reasons why Sanatana Dharma (sometimes mistakenly referred to as “Hinduism”) offers us the best way to find the happiness, peace and prosperity that we’re all seeking. This small article will only offer a very small number of these many benefits of the Dharmic way of life. For more in-depth information, however, visit Dharmacentral.com, the largest and most authoritative source of information on Sanatana Dharma available on the Internet today. In addition, take the time to read the other informative articles available here.

Sanatana Dharma is the most ancient and respected religion in the world. Due to the spiritual peace, personal empowerment, overall health and satisfying lifestyle it offers its followers, Sanatana Dharma has survived intact for over 5000 years. It has survived – when many other religions didn’t – because its teachings are time honored and true. Its lasting influence can be seen in the very name of our tradition, “Sanatana Dharma”, or The Eternal Natural Way.

Dharmic ideas, philosophy, spirituality, and art have influenced more people in world history than any other religion on earth. Among those in the West who have been highly influenced by the teachings of Sanatana Dharma are: Schopenhauer, Herman Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Mark Twain, Romain Rolland, Einstein, Aldous Huxley, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Christopher Isherwood, J.D. Salinger, Arlo Guthrie, George Harrison, movie director David Lynch, and actresses Julia Roberts and Heather Graham, among the many thousands of other well-known writers, intellectuals, scientists, celebrities and artists who have incorporated aspects of Sanatana Dharma into their lives. Even today, tens of millions of Americans, Europeans, famous celebrities, scientists and scholars find spiritual solace and intellectual assurance in the amazing teachings of Dharma.

Sanatana Dharma is the most tolerant, peaceful, and non-fanatical religion in the world today. Unlike many other religions, Sanatana Dharma isn’t based on blind belief, dogma, closed-mindedness or fanaticism. Rather, it is based upon your own intelligent discernment in searching for Truth, your personal experience with God, the guidance of the Vedic scriptures (the most ancient collection of writings in human history), the living example of hundreds of generations of liberated yogis and sages who traversed the path before us, and respect for you as a free person and an intelligent seeker.

In addition to having very rational and fulfilling religious principles, Sanatana Dharma is also a very practical path that offers us real tools for having more peace and joy in our lives. The Yoga, meditation, prayer and ritual practices of Sanatana Dharma have been scientifically proven in thousands of academic research studies to reduce stress, depression, anxiety, nightmares, and many other illnesses. These Dharmic practices have produced multiple millions of enlightened beings throughout world history, and have been proven to be just as relevant and effective in our own modern age. It is for this reason that hundreds of millions of the world’s inhabitants practice meditational techniques today, almost all of which can be ultimately traced back directly to the tradition of Sanatana Dharma.

The Dharmic diet of lacto-vegetarianism (a diet free of meat, fish and eggs…but in which milk products are fine) has been shown by the entire medical community to be the healthiest and most nutritious diet in the world. The traditional Dharmic medical system of Ayurveda is now being studied in many of the top medical colleges in the world as a safe, natural and highly effective sister-modality to contemporary allopathic medicine. And Yoga, the Dharmic path of self-realization, is now practiced by hundreds of millions of people outside of India for optimal health, stress-reduction, clarity of mind, as well as to experience the direct reality of their true spiritual selves. In American alone, about 20 million people practice Yoga on a regular basis. The reason why so many millions of intelligent, educated, health-conscious and spiritually-inclined people practice Yoga is very simple: They’ve seen that it works!

Of all the many reasons why you should be a Dharmi, however, the most important one is because it is through Sanatana Dharma that you can have a personal and vividly transformative experience of God. The ultimate goal of Sanatana Dharma is to experience God’s presence in a radically personal and real way. When God is placed in the center of your personal life and your family life, there is no challenge, no problem, no illness, and no difficulty that you cannot face with courage and contentment. Sanatana Dharma is the most direct path there is for knowing God’s love and grace in your life.

Sanatana Dharma is a religious path that is open to all human beings, regardless of your race, nationality, ethnicity, previous religious background or language. Sanatana Dharma is not “Eastern”, “Indian”, or “Asian”. It transcends all nationalities and ethnicities. All that is required to achieve the maximum benefit that this dynamic path has to offer you is sincerity, humility, an openness to guidance and growth, and your own eagerness to know the Truth. Sanatana Dharma is open to all.

If you find the teachings, lifestyle and practice of Sanatana Dharma to be the answer to your spiritual search, the members of International Sanatana Dharma Society (ISDS) welcome you to embrace this spiritual heritage with joy and renewed vigor. Sanatana Dharma is God’s gift to you and to our suffering world.

For much more information on how you can deepen your understanding of Dharma and begin your exciting journey on this spiritual path today, please visit:

http://www.dharmacentral.com/dharmainfo.php
READ FULL ARTICLE HERE

 


In Defense of Reality

In Defense of Reality
By Sri Dharma Pravartaka Acharya

When did we lose the final memory of our sustaining Reality? At what point did we relinquish our understanding of the Eternal Natural Way? When did we lose our precious connection to Dharma?

Washington CriesWas it when all the ancient sacred temples of the past became the archeological ruins of today? Was it when the medicinal arts, consisting of healing herbs and plants, was replaced by the synthetic poisons we now call pharmaceuticals? Was it when animals went from being our beloved companions to becoming our tortured food? Was it when good conduct and ethical behavior ceased to be a universal value and became, instead, merely a matter of subjective opinion? Was it when nature was no longer seen as a manifestation of God’s loving abundance, but instead seen as a lifeless commodity? Was it when the gods ceased to be beings whom we could speak with face-to-face, and instead became the subject of “myth”? Was it when the bliss of love was replaced by the orgiastic carnival of lust? Was it when works of art stopped being manifestations of beauty and meaning, and became instead exhibitions of narcissistic psychosis on canvas? Was it when we lost the innate human ability to use philosophical discernment and reason, and instead began using our amorphous feelings to make important life decisions? Was it when we sacrificed natural diversity, hierarchy, social sophistication, qualitative depth and personhood upon the altar of artificially imposed conformity and radical egalitarianism? Was it when we abandoned our innate necessity for the expansiveness of freedom and liberty, and submitted instead to the ever-intrusive shackles of the welfare state? Was it when the study of the history of religion eclipsed the impetus to make religious history? Was is when we began to worship dog more than we worship God? Was it when the uninformed opinions of worthless celebrities became more authoritative sources of truth for us than the sacred teachings of the liberated sages? Was it when we merely settled for mediocrity, rather than strove for the very greatest that the cosmos has to offer? When did Reality recede from our vision, and reality television take its place?

We can once again reestablish our cherished connection with Dharma, with a way of living that leads to health, joy, abundance, meaning and spiritual fulfillment for ourselves and for all sentient beings. We can heal ourselves and our Earth by once again relearning and reclaiming the Eternal Natural Way. Begin now.

ARTICLE HERE